Last edited by Mooguktilar
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

3 edition of The Equal Rights Amendment found in the catalog.

The Equal Rights Amendment

The Equal Rights Amendment

the politics and process of ratification of the 27th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution

  • 47 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Haworth Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States.,
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Equal rights amendments -- United States.,
    • Constitutional amendments -- United States -- Ratification.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      StatementSarah Slavin, symposium editor.
      SeriesWomen & politics ;, v. 2, no. 1/2
      ContributionsSlavin, Sarah.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ1236 .W63 vol. 2, no. 1/2, KF4758 .W63 vol. 2, no. 1/2
      The Physical Object
      Pagination153 p. ;
      Number of Pages153
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3489626M
      ISBN 100917724860
      LC Control Number82009340

      After the adoption and ratification of the 19th Amendment, a bold group of women proposed the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). It took Congress almost 50 years to adopt it in The fight for ratification in the states took another 50 years, culminating in Virginia’s historic ratification in January Released on: Aug By Robert Marshall. Many Americans think of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) as an issue from another era in American history. And so it is – a word amendment to the Constitution first proposed in , fiercely debated, but failing of ratification by the deadlines Congress established, then extended by majority vote, for it.

        The E.R.A., a proposed amendment to the Constitution, would guarantee equal legal rights for all American citizens regardless of sex. It would also require states to Author: Maya Salam. Equal Rights Amendment: Over 90 years ago, Alice Paul, who was sometimes imprisoned for her activism in the women’s suffrage movement, wrote the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). The text was a simple sentence: “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.”.

        The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) was a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution. It was advertised as a great benefit to women, something that would rescue them from centuries of second-class citizenship and for the first time put women in the constitution. “Only a Constitutional Amendment, with its massive legal, moral and symbolic impact, can provide the impetus for the necessary changes in our laws,” stated Common Cause, an organization working for ERA passage (The Equal Rights Amendment: A Report on the Proposed 27th Amendment to the Constitution, position sheet, p. 1; italics added).


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The Equal Rights Amendment Download PDF EPUB FB2

She explains why and how the Equal Rights Amendment would add women to the U. Constitution giving women constitutionally protected equal rights. Equal Means Equal is a short, engaging, easy to read book that demonstrates that asking for equality isn't asking for special treatment but for the right to participate in society as equal partners/5(20).

Purchase the “Equal Rights Amendment: Unfinished Business for the Constitution” video (digital download) and watch with friends. Watch the trailer here. Read books about the Equal Rights Amendment with your book club.

Visit to learn more about Alice Paul, the author The Equal Rights Amendment book the Equal Rights Amendment. The Equal Rights Amendment is a constitutional amendment that will guarantee legal gender equality for women and men.

This website is dedicated to educating and inspiring citizens to ratify the ERA, which was written by equal rights activist Alice Paul in   Congress passed the Equal Rights Amendment — after long, hard-fought battles — inby the necessary two-thirds vote, with a seven-year timeline for 38 states to ratify : Carol Jenkins.

When the Equal Rights Amendment was first passed by Congress inRichard Nixon was president and All in the Family’s Archie Bunker was telling his feisty wife Edith to stifle it. Over the course of the next ten years, an initial wave of enthusiasm led to ratification of the ERA by thirty-five states, just three short of the thirty-eight states needed by the deadline.

Richies Picks: ALICE PAUL AND THE FIGHT FOR WOMENS RIGHTS: FROM THE VOTE TO THE EQUAL RIGHTS AMENDMENT by Deborah Kops, Calkins Creek, Februaryp., ISBN: 4/5. Equal Means Equal: Why the Time for an Equal Rights Amendment Is Now - Kindle edition by Neuwirth, Jessica, Steinem, Gloria.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Equal Means Equal: Why the Time for an Equal Rights Amendment Is Now/5(21).

Init seemed ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment was all but a sure thing. First introduced to Congress in by suffragist Alice Paul, the proposed 27th Amendment to the U.S.

"Garret Epps is one of our best legal historians, and he has produced a fascinating book on the creation and impact of the 14th Amendment. The people who wrote our Constitution were America's original Founders, but the amazing group that produced the 14th Amendment were like our second wave of Founders, helping our nation be reborn into the democracy it is today."--Walter Isaacson, author Reviews:   Alice Paul and others at the Metropolitan Opera House.

Image Donated by Corbis - Bettmann “We shall not be safe until the principle of equal rights is written into the framework of our government.

– Alice Paul. If the states ratify it, the Equal Rights Amendment introduced today in Congress would require government to treat men and women with exact equality. The proposed amendment to the U.S. Constitution ensures equal legal rights to all Americans, regardless of sex, and is designed to end distinctions.

This book gives clear and concise (or as concise as you can be when talking about court cases) arguments as to why the Equal Rights Amendment is still necessary. Some surveys have suggested that around 75 percent of people believe that equal rights for women are already in the Constitution -- but they are not/5.

In surveys since the s, a majority of Americans have consistently supported an amendment for equal rights between men and women. Editor’s Note: This story was updated on Feb. 13 to include Author: Stacy Teicher Khadaroo.

In Ohio, many people objected to the constitutional amendment. Chief among these people were union members, including members of the AFL-CIO, who feared that equal rights for women would hurt wages and benefits for male workers.

Eventually women union members placed enough pressure on the men to support the ERA. The s was not the first time the Equal Rights Amendment was proposed to Congress. The amendment was introduced for the first time in but was tabled until the rise of the women’s liberation movement in the s.

It was reintroduced to Congress in and approved by the United States House of Representatives on October 12 th of the same : Marian Phillips.

Just like the modern Equal Rights Amendment, however, Alice’s proposal met with opposition, even from fellow suffragists. Some felt that it would actually harm labor protections for female workers. Due to labor and Progressive movement resistance, the ERA floundered until the s when second-wave feminists took up the cause.

But the Equal Rights Amendment, first proposed in by suffragists Alice Paul and Crystal Eastman, was never ratified. You can in part thank Phyllis Schlafly, the main protagonist of Author: Lauren Puckett.

Join Eagle Forum in Stopping the ERA Amendment. Rosen: [] Julie, in your new book, uh, which will be out in the spring, Women: The Forgotten Mothers of the Equal Rights Amendment, you make a powerful case for why you believe the Equal Rights Amendment should be passed in the 21st century.

So, first, uh, predictably, do you believe that the bipartisan bill might pass the Senate as. The Equal Rights Amendment to the US Constitution was on its way to ratification — until Phyllis Schlafly went on the attack.

Schlafly, a two-time loser for a Congressional seat, and staunch Author: Robert Rorke. T he Equal Rights Amendment to the Constitution was first proposed in the United States Congress in December It was promoted by Alice Paul and National Women's party, but opposed by many of their colleagues who had worked to pass the Nineteenth Amendment (women's suffrage) in   When Congress passed the Equal Rights Amendment init insisted that the amendment be ratified by the states bythat is, within 10 years.

Only 35 states ratified the amendment by the. Inshe wrote the Equal Rights Amendment. It was introduced in Congress. And the national debate over the ERA began. The major principle of the Equal Rights Amendment is that gender should not determine any legal rights of citizens.

Supporters believed the ERA would keep women from being denied equal rights under federal, state, or local : Leeanne Gelletly.